BAO Tower Simulator

 

  Make it work in Win8

plus the

Tower Instructions File

by John Mansolas 

Sep 2014

Running it in Win8 !!

Win8 has scored many negative points by actually blocking a number of important programs running in older Windows versions. Tower BAO simulator was designed in Win 3.1 and was also devised run in WinXP. When the disaster of Win8 appeared I tried in vain for some time especially to fix the problem that Win8 was refusing to use the wing32.dll , a file responsible for the creation of the graphics for the outside view of the Tower . (Note : I was happy to hear lately that Microsoft is quitting Win8 for ever jumping to Win10 etc . It only shows how right we were to accuse Win8 as a flat failure , although we do not yet know if with Win10 Microsoft has really learned its lessons )

So I was just extremely happy to find out almost accidentally that some people who heard the complains from many people on many such cases did try and succeeded in providing us with the solution to see it running in Win8 ! By the way they also found the solution for running TRACON II also in win8

These are the old-games.com people !

And you may check theme at this address: http://www.old-games.com for many similar programs and this address for Tower in particular

http://www.old-games.com/download/4471/tower

 

So go to them and download cheaply the Tower program to run in Win8

You’ll get a folder Tower with this folder structure inside :

The gamefiles are the normal Tower folders all in one , that include exercises, types of aircraft , aerodromes etc.

The setupfiles were created by the old-games people and the running commands are those 2 bat files you see at the bottom , the

2.START THE GAME.bat is the one that replaces the .exe file

 

B U T …. That is not all ….our little magic   was necessary to make it finally really run

Remember this infamous but so necessary Wing32.dll ? Well … the old-games people forgot to include it into their download but … you’ll find this file in the older version of Tower you have . The ‘new’ program will not run if this dll is not found . Its standard place was the Windows/system32 folder and the ‘new’ program will signal its absence on its first attempt to run.

HOWEVER …..

Instead of this I renamed intentionally this file to  _Wing32.dll  and put it under the gamefiles folder. Why ? Because it seems the program is satisfied to check and load all the dll that are found despite the name difference ! Crazy ? Well , for one …. It works fine with me !

It seems though that the reaction is artificial . In the Win3.1 & WinXP there was in the program a check to make sure that the wing32.dll is not misplaced on the root directory . If you put the original wing32.dll under gamefiles now that this plays the role of the root directory , the older Win3.1 caution wakes up and blocks the program. However , as the restructure of the old-games.com works , there is actually no problem apart from this left-over from the 1996 era. So , you should not have the properly named wing32.dll in the root gamefiles directory but in the windows/system32 . To some people however the intervention to system 32 was not accepted by Win8 ! So my solution avoided both negative pitfalls and runs with _wing32.dll under gamefiles.  

So here is the content of my subfolder gamefiles and see the renamed file _wing32.dll as its first file in order

 

AND … you may use the 2.STAR THE GAME.bat command to run it although the old TOWER.EXE under gamefiles can still do the job nicely for you !!!

 

And then ….. Halleluiah …. you are back in business with Tower in Win8 !!!!

 

Tower Instructions

 

-          Introduction

-          Commands in the Air

-          Commands on the ground

Another of the ‘smart ideas’ of Microsoft with Win8 was to make the older Help Files unusable. Another sign of this ‘caring for the client’ L attitude !

This is why I decided to provide you with this content and additionally highlight some important areas for the user

 

Introduction

In order to control aircraft movements in Tower, you will need to be familiar with the following keyboard commands and format.  The general syntax for an air traffic control command is:

1.  The aircraft you want to address or communicate to;

2.  A slash "/" or press the spacebar (which actually adds a comma after the aircraft callsign);

3.  What you want the aircraft to do; and

4.  The value you want the aircraft to achieve when it finished the command.

For example, to taxi AAL1716  (American Airlines flight 1716) to runway 27L, a controller would say, "AAL1716, taxi to runway 27L."  The corresponding keyboard strokes would be:  AAL1716/T27L.  This contains all the proper components: an aircraft callsign, "/"  slash key,  what to do, and a value.

Some commands have no value or parameter slot.  For example: "AAL1716, contact departure."  The keyboard strokes would be: AAL1716/FD.

Every command must begin when only the Lcl/Gnd: prompt is showing on the last line of the Communications section.

If something else is showing after the Lcl/Gnd prompt, or you are midway through some other command and need to cancel it, simply press the ESC key.  In addition, you may use the Backspace key to correct your command if you make a mistake.

The first part of every command requires that you 'select an aircraft.' Make sure the command window is active, then type the full callsign of the aircraft or enough of the callsign to uniquely identify it.  This involves the end of the aircraft identifier, not the beginning -- "N3953T" would normally be called "Cherokee Five Three Tango" on the radio and abbreviated here using its trailing "53T", not the leading "39" as you might otherwise expect.

 

You can also directly input a callsign , and this is by far easier to do , by :

selecting an aircraft , using the right mouse button clicking

on any aircraft target in either the BRITE or ASDE window οr its Flight Strip.

After you have selected the aircraft callsign, select the slush " / " key or press the spacebar.  This puts a comma after the aircraft callsign.  Once you have accomplished that, you are able to issue any command listed below.

Note : By using the mouse right click , there is no need to use any slash or comma to introduce the next command element. After selecting a callsign with a right button mouse click on a label or strip then all you need is simply to press on the keyboard successively the letters of the command without having to separate them with a comma or slash

Example : the command  AAL265/FD is simply done by selecting the callsign AAL265 then pressing F then D .

Approach control normally sequences aircraft to a runway before switching them to the tower.  Even aircraft that call you some 12 miles out from the field have decided to land on the most active runway.  If you issue a command to an aircraft without changing its runway, it will land on the runway it was assigned by approach control.

Caution here :

1.        The sequencing in this programme does not imply proper separation by Approach Control with all randomly generated exercises  

2.        As for the RWY in use it should be the choice of the Tower Control and you may better so include on your landing clearance

You can combine two or more logical commands from the list below and give them to the same aircraft in one transmission.  For instance, you could issue "AAL265, break out of traffic, contact departure" (AAL265/B/FD).  The commas in this instance indicate where you have pressed the slash (/) key to signify the start of a command.

In the following commands, you will notice several have (Rwy) next to them.  This indicates you can use this command and attach an optional parameter which can change an aircraft's assigned runway. If a command has (deg.) after it, enter a value between 0 and 360.  This will request the pilot to turn to the heading.  (Ex.: Entering a value of 90 requests that the pilot fly due east).

 

Commands for traffic in the air

 

COMMAND

KEY(S) TO PRESS after the Callsign selection

Explanation

Cleared to Land

C   L

Given to an aircraft already on final approach, clearing it to land.

Go Around                    

 

G

Instructs pilot to cancel the landing.  This is normally used only in emergency situations especially if the RWY is not yet cleared from previous traffic or unavailable for some other reason

Enter Left Downwind (Rwy)

 

E  L  D  #

# is the number of the RWY

Instructs pilot to enter left downwind for the designated runway. 

Ex : N112AK  E  L  D  9

Enter Left Base (Rwy)

E  L  B #

# is the number of the RWY

Instructs pilot to enter a left base for designated runway. 

Enter Right Base (Rwy)

E  R  B #

# is the number of the RWY

Instructs pilot to enter a Right base for designated runway. 

Enter Right Downwind (Rwy)           

E R D #

# is the number of the RWY

Instructs pilot to enter right downwind for the designated runway. 

Enter Final (Rwy)

E   F  #

# is the number of the RWY

Instructs a pilot to enter a final approach to a specific runway.

Important note : If a pilot is already instructed for a specific Runway which you do not need to change , the Runway number # is not necessary.  So for someone already instructed for , say , RWY 9 initially , the E F simply means Enter Finals … of Runway 9 , without having to type again the 9 after E and F

Report Left Downwind (Rwy)

P  L  D #

# is the number of the RWY

Tells pilot to report when established on a left downwind to a specific runway.

Report Right Downwind (Rwy)

P  R  D #

# is the number of the RWY

Tells pilot to report when established on a right  downwind to a specific runway.

Report on Finals

P   F   #

# is the number of the RWY

Tells pilot to report when established on the final of a specific runway. The reply report may contain as well the distance from the aerodrome

Cleared for Touch and Go

C           G

Usually given to aircraft established on final approach or in the VFR pattern. This authorizes the pilot to land and immediately take-off. Used most for pilot training, maintenance checks on aircraft, etc.( Command suitable for training flights)

Cleared for Low Approach         

 

C   A

Given to an aircraft on final approach or in the VFR pattern.  This command authorizes the pilot to fly over the runway without touching it.  This is exactly the same as a touch and go, except the pilot does not make contact with the ground. .( Command suitable for training flights)

Cleared for the Option

 

C   O

Given to an aircraft on final approach or in the VFR pattern.  It authorizes the pilot to execute a low approach, touch and go, full stop landing, or a stop and go. .( Command suitable for training flights)

Make Left 180

 

M   L   1

or

M   L   18

Instructs a pilot to make a left turn to the opposite direction currently flying.

Make Left 360              

M   L   3

or

M   L   36

Instructs a pilot to make a left turn and circle back to the direction currently flying.

Make Right 180

 

M   R   1

or

M   L   18

Instructs a pilot to make a right turn to the opposite direction currently flying.

Make Right 360            

M   R   3

or

M   L   36

Instructs a pilot to make a right turn and circle back to the direction currently flying.

Like a local hold , used mainly to prevent a conflict with preceding traffic in air or ground if there is no threat of succeeding traffic 

Turn Left to Heading (deg.)  

U  L  H   ###

Instructs aircraft to make a left turn to indicated heading. This is used only with the radar screen (BRITE) and the number of heading is always entered in 3 digits

Turn Right to Heading (deg.)

U  R  H   ###

Instructs aircraft to make a left turn to indicated heading. This is used only with the radar screen (BRITE) and the number of heading is always entered in 3 digits

Make Short Approach

M   S

Instructs a pilot to make a shortened final approach. Helps sometimes a quicker runway vacation

Extend Downwind           

 

X

When issued, an aircraft will fly a longer downwind leg before turning to base. Controller must tell later the aircraft to turn base. Used to avoid conflict with preceding traffic on finals or non-availability of the RWY at this moment to instruct this traffic for finals

Turn Out Approved

A   T

Selected aircraft may turn in any direction and leave the traffic pattern.  Once the aircraft is out of your airspace you would switch them to departure control.

Left Turn Out Approved

A   L   T

Selected aircraft will turn left out of traffic.

Right Turn Out Approved

A   R  T

Selected aircraft will turn left out of traffic.

Break Out of Traffic

 

B

Instructs pilot to break the current traffic pattern and wait for the tower's call from an initial entry point to the airport traffic area.

Contact Departure           

 

F   D

Causes the departing aircraft to change frequencies and contact the departure controller after take-off and no longer needed by Tower Controller.

Caution : does not apply to an arrival flight

 

Commands for traffic on the Ground

Taxi to (Rwy)   

T   #

# is the number of the RWY

 

Causes an aircraft to taxi to a specified runway.  If there are any runways between the aircraft's current location, and the runway they have been taxied to, they'll automatically cross them unless told to hold short.

Cleared for Takeoff

C   T

Authorizes departing aircraft to take off and , if not already in it , enter onto the assigned runway and take off

Taxi to Parking 

 

T   P

Causes an aircraft to taxi to parking. The aircraft will cross any runways in-between unless told to hold short of them.

Caution : This program does not define or controls to which parking position the aircraft goes ! You may have to Delete a taxiing traffic to avoid a conflict

Hold Your Position           

 

H   Y

Instructs an aircraft to hold its current position.

Mainly used to stop taxiing traffic from conflicting with other taxiing traffic or crossing a runway in use

Continue Taxiing

T   U

Causes an aircraft to continue taxiing after it was told to stop or hold its position by a controller

Taxi Into Position and Hold          

 

T   H

Requests an aircraft to taxi onto the assigned runway and hold this position, awaiting takeoff clearance.

Better known as “Line-Up on RWY and Wait for T/O clearance”

Cancel Takeoff Clearance

 

C   C

Cancels a previously issued takeoff clearance.  If the aircraft has already started their takeoff roll, it will stop on the runway.  Cleared for takeoff is the only command it recognizes

Hold Short (Rwy)                       

 

H   S   ###

# is the number of the RWY

Requests a taxiing aircraft to hold short of a selected runway.

Caution : It does not always work efficiently this command. Better use the Hold Position

Say Altitude     

S  A

Requests an aircraft to report its current altitude.

Say Heading    

S  H

Requests an aircraft to report its current heading.

Say Rate of Climb

S   R

Requests an aircraft to report the rate of climb.

Say Position

S   P

Requests an aircraft to report  where it is, either on the ground or in the air.

Say Again        

S   G

Requests the last pilot transmission to you to be repeated.

Say Speed

S   S

Requests an aircraft to report its current speed.

 

Disregard & Correction

 

Disregard                     

 

Press ESC button

Pressing ESC acts as a 'disregard' command and clears the command buffer.  Nothing typed will be sent to the aircraft unless the Enter key was pressed.

Correction        

Press Back-Space Key

Deletes letters that represent parts of the command

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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